100% Hat

pattheflip:

I decided to sit out for most of the last month or so of games internet misogyny shit, opting instead of signal boost the good people willing to jump into the fray themselves. There is one thing I wanted to write a short note about, though — the identity of “gamer” and why I haven’t used it myself…

gamepreservation:

Character design from Disney’s unreleased American Final Fantasy comic book adaptation, circa 1991.

gamepreservation:

Character design from Disney’s unreleased American Final Fantasy comic book adaptation, circa 1991.

gamepreservation:

From my personal collection: it’s the very first advertisement for the Nintendo Entertainment System!

This particular copy comes from a November, 1985 issue of New York magazine. In fact, as far as I can tell, New York is the only publication that ever ran it.

Seem kind of strange? Well, let’s remember that in 1985, there weren’t any video game magazines left. They’d all either shut down or converted into computer magazines…usually both. But why New York magazine specifically?

That’s because Nintendo didn’t launch the NES nationwide right away. They only sold it in New York during the 1985 holiday season, as a test; video games were dead, and no store wanted to carry them, so Nintendo had to prove that people even wanted the thing.

You can read all about the 1985 NES test market launch, including interviews with three people who worked it, if you go back in time about six months and head to 1UP.com. Apparently they nuked a lot of the old features and, game preservationist though I am, I am terrible at archiving my own work.

animatedscreenshots:

Depression Quest
kittenclanclan:

I told everyone I was glad they listened to my request to include Master Chief riding the Vic Viper in the new Smash Bros, but deep down I wondered if I was just being pandered to.

kittenclanclan:

I told everyone I was glad they listened to my request to include Master Chief riding the Vic Viper in the new Smash Bros, but deep down I wondered if I was just being pandered to.

kittenclanclan:

man these smash bros screenshots just keep getting weirder

kittenclanclan:

man these smash bros screenshots just keep getting weirder

cipater:

gamespite:

readingegm:

EGM #110

This is a huge feature on women in gaming and the games industry that Electronic Gaming Monthly ran. It contains interviews, editorial remarks, and general cultural information from the time period. It carries a lot of “90’s opinions” (in all the resonances that phrase could have) about women, but I think it is a huge historical resource and I would encourage people to share it around. Publications writing about women in games is not new, and this is something to point to in order to make that case. 

I still remember this feature vividly. It was the point at which I paused and realized — whoa, EGM was more than just dudes vomiting up hundreds of screen shots of Japanese games.

More importantly, this article made me really stop and think about gaming stereotypes and assumptions, something that stuck with me. I remember the few girls and women on the gaming forum I frequented at the time being really excited about this piece, and talking about how much they identified with it. Ever since then, many of my perspectives on the medium have been shaped in large part by women in my life — friends, family, online associates, colleagues, role models. 

I never take part in the online shouting matches about gender and games, because adding to the noise won’t accomplish anything except to make like-minded people pat me on the back. I don’t need it. I’m a straight white dude; this discussion shouldn’t be about me. I try to use my place in the press to create a positive impact in less dramatic ways: Giving writing gigs and assignments to women, advocating for protagonists and characters who aren’t stubbly white guys, and constantly praising games that allow anyone to express themselves.

Anyway, Lauren Fielder’s EGM feature from more than 15 years ago helped open my eyes to all of this. A great and essential bit of work, here.

Reblogging again for Jeremy Parish being awesome, as per usual.